Health Matters | 5 Summer Sun Safety Tips

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5 Summer Sun Safety Tips

It is summer and time for some fun in the sun. The sun’s warmth and brightness can relax us and boost our spirits. The benefits are wonderful, but overexposure can lead to some dangerous health issues. Each year more than three and a half million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States. So whether you’re planning a trip to the beach, hitting the golf course, or enjoying a backyard cookout, remember to protect yourself from the sun.

These five simple rules can help you enjoy the sunshine without risking your health:

1. Wear Proper Clothing
Your clothes can be an effective form of protection from the sun’s harmful rays. Some outdoor clothing now carries an Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) rating. The UPF rating lets you know how well the fabric shields your skin from ultraviolet (UV) rays. All fabrics block UV rays to some degree, but the most effective have a UPF rating from 15 (good) to more than 50 (excellent). For example, a white cotton t-shirt has a UPF of five. Blue jeans have a UPF of 1,700. In other words, densely woven and bright or dark colored fabrics offer the best defense from the sun’s rays. Light-weight, loose-fitting long sleeves and pants also help. Don’t forget a hat and sunglasses to protect your head and eyes and put sunscreen on exposed skin.

2. Use Sunscreen
Apply sunscreen generously and reapply it regularly. The Sun Protection Factor (SPF) measures how long unprotected skin can be theoretically exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays before causing damage. UVA rays can prematurely age your skin, causing wrinkles and age spots. UVB rays can burn your skin. Too much exposure to either can cause skin cancer.

Keep in mind that sunscreen is often not applied thoroughly or evenly, and it might wash off while you swim or sweat. That means sunscreen might be less effective than the SPF number might lead you to believe. Dermatologists suggest that along with the sunscreen’s SPF, you should choose a “broad spectrum” sunscreen that offers protection from UVA and UVB rays. It is important to reapply sunscreen frequently, especially if sweating or in water.

3. Seek The Shade
The sun’s rays are usually strongest between 10 o’clock in the morning and 4 o’clock in the afternoon. If you are outside, find shade from a structure, a leafy tree, or a sun umbrella for protection. Also, try to arrange your schedule so that you can take advantage of the early morning and late afternoon for your outdoor activities.

4. Avoid Tanning
A lot of people like to tan on the beach or in a tanning salon, but tanning is never safe. A tan happens because your body is trying to protect itself and prevent further skin damage. Your skin darkens because it creates a wall of darker pigment called melanin which acts like a sunscreen to protect from the sun’s harmful rays. Ultraviolet rays can damage the DNA of unprotected skin and lead to mutations which can cause cancer. Even sunbeds or tanning booths almost triple your chances of developing melanoma, a sometimes fatal skin cancer. The best way to decrease your risk of developing skin cancer is to avoid tanning.

5. Examine Yourself - Head to Toe
The Skin Cancer Foundation suggests that you give yourself a full body examination every month. Look for any changes to your skin. These changes can be an early warning sign of cancer. Changes include any skin growths, moles, beauty marks, or brown spots that appear suspicious. See a doctor if you have any doubts or questions about your skin.

Remember that newborns and children are especially sensitive to the sun. Protecting their skin is crucial. Follow these good sun habits so that you can enjoy all kinds of outdoor activities without risking your health.



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